Technical Notes

Teacher Quality Dashboard: Technical Notes

  1. Selection Criteria– These tables reflects data reported to the U.S. Department of Education by the state of North Carolina as per Title II of the Higher Education Act. For this data, postgraduate is defined as an initial teacher credential program at the postgraduate level.The alternative teacher education programs referenced prepare qualified individuals who do not have an undergraduate degree in education to teach in elementary, middle, and/or high schools.
  2. Academic Profile of UNC Education Graduates vs UNC Non-Education Graduates-These tables reflect academic data on UNC education and non-education graduates obtained from UNC General Administration’s Office of Institutional Research. UNC education graduates are students enrolled in our 15 educator preparation programs. UNC non-education graduates include all other students enrolled in UNC institutions.
  3. Licensure Exam Results-These tables reflects data reported to the U.S. Department of Education by the state of North Carolina as per Title II of the Higher Education Act. These pass rates show the percentage of students who passed Praxis assessment(s) taken for initial certification or licensure in their field of preparation. These summary assessment pass rates show the percentage of students who passed a particular assessment among all who took the assessment. The pass rate data included in these tables present the data at an aggregate level.
  4. Enrollment Trends-These figures reflect data on the fall enrollment headcounts for UNC institutions with a school, college or department of education. The data was obtained from UNC General Administration’s Office of Institutional Research.
  5. Teacher Productivity Data by Institution & Licensure Area-These tables reflect data on the UNC system’s productivity of initially licensed teacher education graduates and alternative licensure completers. Alternative licensure completers are prepared through alternative teacher education programs. These programs prepare qualified individuals who do not have an undergraduate degree in education to teach in elementary, middle, and/or high schools. The data was obtained from UNC General Administration’s Office of Institutional Research and verified by each UNC educator preparation program.
  6. Student Teaching/Clinical Experiences-Under Development
  7. Time to Degree– These tables reflect data on the duration of time to degree completion for UNC education graduates, including full and part-time students. Data is available for both undergraduate and graduate degrees in education. “N” represents the number of participants included in the research sample. The data was obtained from UNC General Administration’s Office of Institutional Research.
  8. Teacher Portals Breakout by County & School-These figures reflect data showing the percentage of teachers, by portal, working in a school district or school. A portal is defined as a route of preparation to enter the teaching profession. To assign teachers to portals we used undergraduate and graduate-level data from UNC General Administration, as well as education, licensure, and salary files from the NC Department of Public Instruction. To determine which individuals were paid as teachers in a school-year and in which districts and schools they worked, we used certified salary files provided by the NC Department of Public Instruction.
  9. Retention Rates in the Teaching Field at 3 and 5 Years of Experience-These data reflect the percentage of teachers, by route of preparation, who persist for three and five years of teaching in North Carolina’s public schools.  These data are for four cohorts of first-time teachers from the 2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2007-2008, and 2008-2009 academic years.  Data to track teacher retention comes from certified salary files supplied by the NC Department of Public Instruction.
  10. Results of Recent Graduate Survey-These tables reflect the responses of first-year teachers to the 2013-2014 Recent Graduate Survey. The Recent Graduate Survey was developed by researchers at the Education Policy Initiative at Carolina in the fall of 2013 and spring of 2014. Partnering with the NC Department of Public Instruction, the survey was administered to first-year teachers in April of 2014.
  11. Program Effectiveness: Value-Added Models-These data reflect the adjusted average value-added effectiveness of UNC system teachers initially prepared at the undergraduate level relative to all other sources of teachers. These results come from multi-level models with a rich set of student, classroom/teacher, and school covariates. The data to complete these analyses was obtained from UNC General Administration and the NC Department of Public Instruction.
  12. Program Effectiveness: Teacher Evaluation Ratings-To assess the impact of UNC system teacher preparation programs on the evaluation ratings of their initially prepared teachers, data was collected via the North Carolina Educator Evaluation System (NCEES) from 2010-11 through 2012-13. This teacher sample consists of all North Carolina public school (NCPS) teachers with less than five years of experience in the 2008-09 through 2012-13 academic years. These results come from multi-level models with a rich set of student, classroom/teacher, and school covariates. The data to complete these analyses was obtained from UNC General Administration and the NC Department of Public Instruction.
  13. Distribution of Employed Graduates by County—These data reflect the percentage of teachers in each NC school district initially prepared by each of the 15 UNC system institutions and the percentage of each UNC system institutions’ graduates working in particular school districts. Data for these maps was obtained from UNC General Administration, as well as certified salary files from the NC Department of Public Instruction.
  14. Job Placement Rates-These tables reflect the percentage of initially-prepared teachers, over time, by university, and by licensure area, securing teaching positions in NC public schools within one, two, and three years. This data represents the number/percentage of graduates in a cohort employed as teachers in NC public schools. Data identifying all initially-prepared teachers was obtained from UNC General Administration. We paired these data with certified salary files from the NC Department of Public Instruction to determine who was paid as a teacher in an academic year.
  15. School Characteristics of NC Principals-These tables reflect data from a comprehensive evaluation of the North Carolina Principal Fellows Program (PFP). The PFP is designed to prepare outstanding candidates for school administrator positions in NC schools. Principal Fellows receive a competitive, merit-based scholarship loan to attend one of eleven participating UNC system institutions and earn a Master’s degree in School Administration (MSA). The study sample consists of full-time principals in the 2005-06 through 2011-12 school years prepared by PFP, as well as other UNC MSA graduates and principals with all other types of preparation. The data used to complete these analyses was obtained from UNC General Administration and the NC Department of Public Instruction.
  16. Individual Characteristics of NC Principals-These tables reflect data from a comprehensive evaluation of the North Carolina Principal Fellows Program (PFP). The PFP is designed to prepare outstanding candidates for school administrator positions in NC schools. Principal Fellows receive a competitive, merit-based scholarship loan to attend one of eleven participating UNC system institutions and earn a Master’s degree in School Administration (MSA). The study sample consists of full-time principals in the 2005-06 through 2011-12 school years prepared by PFP, as well as other UNC MSA graduates. The data used to complete these analyses was obtained from UNC General Administration and the NC Department of Public Instruction.
  17. University School Teacher Education Partnerships (USTEP)-These maps reflect data on existing partnerships reported by UNC’s 15 educator preparation programs. It is important to note that several North Carolina counties are comprised of more than one school district.